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Login errors on Nexus

How do I log into Nexus computers?

Password incorrect message/forgot your password?

  • Ensure that you are typing in your Nexus login password exactly as you typed it when you created it. 
  • Ensure that you are typing your characters in the correct case
    • Ensure the Caps lock key is NOT depressed on your keyboard
    • Ensure that you are including any numbers you created your password with, etc.
  • If you still cannot log in

No such userid message

This message indicates that the server does not recognize the userid you typed.

  • If your account exists, check the exact spelling of your userid. 
  • Has it been 4 months or more since your graduation? If so, please contact the ACO Help Desk for assistance.
  • Try WatIAM's Lookup User ID page to look up your userid.
  • If you still cannot log in
    • Or, visit the ACO Help Desk, and bring a photo ID card, preferably your Student ID card.

Managing files on Nexus

View how much of your disk space is currently used 

While logged in on a Windows machine connected to Nexus:

  1. Click on the Start button in the bottom left and type cmd.exe and start a Command Window.
  2. Type C:/Nexus/quota, and then press Enter.
  3. Click on the Storage Quotas icon (Nexus quota button) at the bottom right of your Nexus windows screen to view Quota Tool info.
    1. You will see how much quota you have left under Current N: disk (% used).
    2. If you want to be warned when you reach a specific usage point, enter an appropriate value in the Warn if % used >: text box. (For example, entering 90 will trigger a notification when you have used more than 90% of your allotted storage space.)

Getting more disk space

To obtain more space, you have three options

Delete files

While logged in on a Nexus machine and account:

  • Click on the Start button in the bottom left, and click on your name at the top right of the menu ([Your Last Name], [Your First Name])  
  • The files contained in this window contribute to your storage allotment.
    • Delete any unneeded files from the Downloads or My Documents folders to clear up space for usage. 

External Storage 

You can clear space on your N: drive by transferring files to

Contact the Arts Computing Office for alternatives

Saving flies

When you log into a Nexus station in any of the Faculty of Arts labs, you have write-access to (i.e., you can save files on), the drives listed in the table below.

Backups

It is good practice to save multiple back-ups of files, especially important files. Saving files on both your Nexus N: drive and USB  key generally works well.

Here is a list of the different drives you will find on a Nexus computer (you do not have write access to the C: drive (Local Disk)).

Drive Letter

Label

Description

E:USB Key

Used to save files onto, and to retrieve files from, a personal USB key.

N:youruserid on 'Artsfileu'

Used to save files onto, and to retrieve files from, your personal disk space ("N: drive) on a Nexus network server.

The N: drive is mounted to your personal disk space on a Nexus network server every time you log into the Nexus network, regardless of what station you log into.

Separate backups of your N: drive are saved every hour, night, and week going back 2 weeks for easy retrieval. This means that if you accidentally delete or overwrite files saved on your N: drive, you can retrieve your N: drive files from back ups! 

The N: drive is the ideal location to store the first copy of most of your files.

There is a Windows backup tool that will allow you to access older versions of files saved on your N: drive.

  1. On a Nexus Windows machine, click the Start button at the bottom left and then choose Computer.
  2. Open your N: drive and browse to the file you want to retrieve a previous version of.
  3. Right click on the file and select  Restore previous versions.
    1. You will see any available previous versions.
    2. Click on the one you would like to restore and click the Restore button.

Accessing Nexus from home

Accessing 'N:' drive files from off campus via VPN

VPN connects your home computer securely to the University of Waterloo's campus network. This type of connection bypasses any restrictions you would encounter on an off-campus computer. Read more about the benefits of using VPN.

Windows

  1. Install VPN client:
    1. Information Systems and Technology's (IST) documentation on installing and using the VPN client.
    2. Instructional video on how to connect to VPN for Windows 
  2. Map your 'N:' drive to your personal computer:
    1. Go to This PC
    2. Click on Map Network Drive in the top menu
    3. Select a letter for the drive (you may choose the 'N:' drive for consistency with on campus work)
    4. Enter the appropriate path for the drive:
      1. For Arts faculty, staff and graduate students:
        \\artsfileu.uwaterloo.ca\artshome$\userid
      2. For Psychology staff, faculty and graduate students:
        \\files\users$\userid
      3. For Renison staff and faculty:
        \\renfileu.uwaterloo.ca\renhome$\userid
      4. For St. Paul’s staff and faculty:
        \\stpfileu.uwaterloo.ca\stphome$\userid

      5. For Arts undergrad students:
        \\files.uwaterloo.ca\students$\userid

  3. Click OK

MAC OS

  1. Install VPN client:
    1. IST's documentation on installing and using the VPN client.
  2. Map your 'N:' drive to your personal computer:
    1. In Finder, click on Go in the top menu
    2. Select Connect to Server
    3. Enter the appropriate path:
      1. For Arts faculty, staff and graduate students:
        smb://artsfileu.uwaterloo.ca/artshome$/userid
      2. For Psychology staff, faculty and graduate students:
        smb://files/users$/userid
      3. For Renison staff and faculty:
        smb://renfileu.uwaterloo.ca/renhome$/userid
      4. For St. Paul’s staff and faculty:
        smb://stpfileu.uwaterloo.ca/stphome$/userid

      5. For Arts undergrad students:
        smb://files.uwaterloo.ca/students$/userid

    4. When it connects, right click on the folder and click Make Alias. This alias can be put onto your desktop for easy access.

Accessing 'N:' drive files, applications, etc. from off campus via remote desktop (RDP) connection

This type of connection allows you to access all the applications and files on your office PC from your off-campus computer. You must log off your on-campus computer but leave it turned on for this type of connection to work.

Mapping 'N:' drives

Map a network drive to get to it from File Explorer in Windows without having to look for it or type its network address each time.

  1. Open File Explorer from the taskbar or the Start  menu, or press the Windows logo key  + E.
  2. Select This PC from the left pane. Then, on the Computer tab, select Map network drive.
  3. In the Drive list, select a drive letter. (Any available letter will do.)
  4. In the Folder box, type the path of the folder or computer, or select Browse to find the folder or computer. To connect every time you log on to your PC, select the Reconnect at sign-in check box.
  5. Select Finish.

Note: If there are other network drives you need to add, follow the same steps above making sure to use the needed file path in step 4.

How to migrate files from N:\ drive to OneDrive


Mapping a network drive

Mapping a network drive on a Windows 7 machine

1. Open Computer by clicking the Start button and then clicking Computer

2. Click Map Network Drive

3. In the Drive list, click any available drive letter. 

4. In the Folder box, type the path of the folder or computer, or click Browse to find the folder or computer. To connect every time you log on to your computer, select the Reconnect at login check box. 

5. Click Finish

Mapping a network drive on a Windows 10 machine

If the machine is not on a campus connection (wired or eduroam), the user will need to first install & connect to the VPN: How to install and connect to the VPN - Windows OS.  

After this: 

1. Open File Explorer from the taskbar or the Start menu, or press the Windows logo key + E

2. Select This PC from the left pane. Then, on the Computer tab, select Map network drive

3. In the Drive list, select a drive letter. (Any available letter will do.) 

4. In the Folder box, type the path of the folder or computer, or select Browse to find the folder or computer. To connect every time you log on to your PC, select the Reconnect at sign-in check box. 

5. Select Finish

Mapping a network drive on a Mac

If the machine is not on a campus connection (wired or eduroam), the user will need to first install & connect to the VPN: How to install and connect to the VPN - Mac OS.  

1. In the main toolbar, click  Go > Connect to Server

2. In the Server Address field, type in smb://[path].  See the section below for common paths. 

3. Click Connect. Now a window showing the contents of the user's N: drive should show up and a drive icon on their desktop.  

4. To save this icon as a shortcut on the desktop so that the user doesn't have to click Go > Connect to Server every time to access their N: drive, click on the drive icon, and select File > Make Alias. Another drive icon should appear, however this one will remain after they turn off/reboot the system. Rename it so the user knows that's their N: drive (Ex. "userID N: drive")

Mapping a network share in MacOS​

1. In the Finder, select the Go menu, select Connect to Server

2. Enter the address to where the resource is you wish to map in the Server Address field. (i.e. smb://servername/foldername

3. Select the + button to save the Server Address to your list of Favourite Servers. 

4. Enter the username and password that is required to access the resource. Check the Remember this password in my keychain box if you wish to store the credentials for use at a later time. 

5. A new icon should appear on the desktop. That is your mapped network drive. If the icon doesn't appear on the desktop, follow the Displaying the network share on the desktop instructions below. 

Displaying the network share on the desktop (MacOS)

1. Open the Finder Preferences pane. 

2. Make sure the box next to Connected Servers under General is checked. 

3. Right-click on the icon on your desktop representing the mounted drive. 

4. Choose Make Alias (and optionally rename the drive to something more specific). 

5. Go back and uncheck the box next to Connected Servers. 


Nexus computer labs